I’m looking to hoard targets (passes thrown intended for a given receiver).

My projections had the Dolphins going 5-1 in the AFC East, which seems unrealistic. But with QB Tiers voters seeing little difference between Jay Cutler and injured 2016 starter Ryan Tannehill, an 8-8 finish seems within reach for a team that overachieved by going 10-6 last season. Jay Cutler has an 0-2 career record against Brady, in case you were curious.

At wide receiver, I’m looking to hoard targets (passes thrown intended for a given receiver). I want to stack up as many projectable targets as I can from my three starters. Volume is key at wideout, just like running back, but you’ll find that many of your opponents will pick players who might only see four or five passes come their way in a game. This is a key mistake.

T1. Aaron Rodgers, QB | Green Bay Packers: If Green Bay’s offense can get out of the gate hot and avoid the troubles it had in the first half of the 2016 season, its mustachioed, tape-recorder-carrying, superstar signal-caller could run away with awards such as this. We’ll find out tomorrow, but I’m guessing he did all right in our preseason MVP poll, too.

T1. Le’Veon Bell, RB | Pittsburgh Steelers: Fresh off his holdout, Bell generates absolutely no skepticism from our panel. Perhaps that’s because his mere availability for Week 1 is close to unprecedented. This will be Bell’s fifth season in the NFL but only the second in which he is neither injured nor suspended to start the season. The one season he played all 16 games was 2014, when he rushed for 1,361 yards and eight touchdowns and caught 85 passes for another 845 yards and three touchdowns. To imagine a full Bell season is to imagine, basically, all of the yards. The only weird thing is that Arizona’s David Johnson, another all-purpose yardage monster, didn’t crack our top three.steelers_130

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